· software-development

Deliberate Practice: Watching yourself fail

Think bayes cover medium

I've recently been reading the literature written by K. Anders Eriksson and co on Deliberate Practice and one of the suggestions for increasing our competence at a skill is to put ourselves in a situation where we can fail.

I've been reading Think Bayes - an introductory text on Bayesian statistics, something I know nothing about - and each chapter concludes with a set of exercises to practice, a potentially perfect exercise in failure!

I've been going through the exercises and capturing my screen while I do so, an idea I picked up from one of the papers:

our most important breakthrough was developing a relatively inexpensive and efficient way for students to record their exercises on video and to review and analyze their own performances against well-defined criteria

Ideally I'd get a coach to review the video but that seems too much of an ask of someone. Antonios has taken a look at some of my answers, however, and made suggestions for how he'd solve them which has been really helpful.

After each exercise I watch the video and look for areas where I get stuck or don't make progress so that I can go and practice more in that area. I also try to find inefficiencies in how I solve a problem as well as the types of approaches I'm taking.

These are some of the observations from watching myself back over the last week or so:

One of the suggestions that Eriksson makes for practice sessions is to focus on 'technique' during practice sessions rather than only on outcome but I haven't yet been able to translate what exactly that would involved in a programming context.

If you have any ideas or thoughts on this approach do let me know in the comments.

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